Tag Archives: Handi Quilter

Meet Road 2018 Emerald Sponsors

Road to California would not be the premier consumer quilt show that it is without our sponsors. “Our sponsors are what keeps us competitive,” shared Show Owner, Matt Reese. Because of their generous support, Road continues to attract the industry’s finest entrants, teachers and vendors which are enjoyed by the thousands of our guests that attend our event.

Road 2018 has five Emerald Sponsors. To be at this second level of sponsorship, (our platinum sponsor, Gammill, is the highest level), an organization donates $5,000. Their generous contribution goes toward prize money for the quilt show contest as well as help fund other aspects of the event. Each Emerald Sponsor will also have a vendor booth on the main floor.

This year’s Emerald Sponsors include:

Babylock  has been dedicated to the love of sewing for over 40 years by creating machines for sewing, embroidery, quilting and serging – all with ease-of-use, high quality and a touch of elegance. In addition to easy-to-thread sergers and machines for sewers of any level, Baby Lock enhances the love of sewing with an extensive line of sewing supplies including feet, accessories, software and stabilizer. A family business with headquarters in St. Louis, Missouri, all Baby Lock machines and products are sold exclusively through Independent Authorized Baby Lock Retailers that can be found throughout the United States and Canada.  Babylock products are never sold online.

Teachers whose students will be using Babylock machines in their classes include Jodi Barrows, Jenny Doan, Carmen Geddes, Sheila McKay, Cindy Meyers, and Helen Robinson

Handi Quilter makes a reliable, low-maintenance longarm quilting machine. Its innovative technology and quality engineering provide the functionality that quilters demand along with the smoothest stitch in the industry. Every machine is backed by their trusted HQ warranty. They have over 300 trained HQ local retailers, plus offer HQ customer service, education, and technical support. They will be providing machines for classes taught by Suzanne Hyland and Margaret Solomon-Gunn.

Janome’s mission is to produce machines which inspire creativity and innovation, yet are simple to use. In Japanese, the word Janome (pronounced Ja-NO-me) means “eye of the snake.” The company earned the name in the 1920s when founder Yosaku Ose, a pioneer in Japanese sewing manufacturing, began to use a round metal bobbin system instead of the traditional long shuttle. The Japanese thought the new round bobbin looked like a snake’s eye, and from the innovative design, a name was born.

Janome products have been at the cutting edge of sewing technology since the earliest days of their founding. They were the first to develop a computerized machine for home use (the Memory 7, in 1979), the first to offer professional style embroidery to the home market (the Memory Craft 8000, in 1990) and the first to offer a long-arm quilting machine for home use (the Memory Craft 6500P, in 2003). Today, their flagship model, the Horizon Memory Craft 15000, is redefining the way sewists enjoy their hobby. This revolutionary machine is the first-ever wireless-enabled sewing machine.

Janome machines will be made available to students in classes taught by Karla Alexander, Bonnie Browning, Gundrun Erla, and Lora Kennedy.

Moore’s is a family owned business. It started with Edd Moore the founder of Moore’s. Then his son,  Jim Moore, took over the company. Today, the company is owned by George Moore.  In business fo rover 60 years, Moore’s has seven locations throughout Southern California. They are retailers of Pfaff, Brother, and Baby Lock machines. Moore’s offers interactive classes taught by knowledgeable sewing educators that teach how to use their machines to thier fullest potential. 

Pollard’s Sew Creative began in Glendora, California in 1994 when Bill and Marcia Pollard decided to open a fabric store. The shop quickly grew and was warmly welcomed into the community. They were joined in 2002 by their daughter, Jenny Nobile who helped expand their business to a second location in Arcadia, California.

Proud of their exceptional customer service and devotion to helping customers stay up-to-date with the latest sewing trends, Pollard’s is also known for their excellent sewing and embroidery classes, and their unique one-of-a-kind products. They are exclusive dealers of Pfaff, Husqvarna Viking and Bernina’s E-16 machines.

Pollard’s is supplying the machines that will be used by students in Pam Bocko, Cindy Grisdela, Connie Spurlock, Deb Tucker, and Pat Yamin. Pollard’s will be offering these demonstration machines at blow-out prices at the end of the show.

Please join us in supporting these wonderful sponsors.

 

Outstanding Art Quilt – Road 2017

Emma in the Looking Glass was made and quilted by Lenore Crawford who won $5,000 from sponsor, Handi Quilter.Winning Quilt by Lenore Crawford

Lenore Crawford is no stranger to Road to California. She has been a member of the teaching faculty in the past and in 2014, she won in the same category, Outstanding Art Quilt, for her work, Capturing Brittany.

Lenore started quilting in the late 1990’s using 2” fabric squares as her art medium in the watercolor quilting style.  She created impressionistic art quilts with the squares.  Up until that time, she hadn’t done any quilting; just lots of other things with different mediums.

What inspired Lenore to create Emma in the Looking Glass? Lenore along with her friend, her friend’s daughter and granddaughter were visiting Lenore’s mother’s gardens where there is a beautiful lily pond that Lenore’s step-father had built.  Emma, the granddaughter, was playing around the pond when Lenore took her picture.  It was a beautiful sunny day in mid-summer and Lenore was “really inspired by the whole scene.”

Lenore spent several months in the winter of 2016 creating Emma in the Looking Glass.  It was one of the very first quilts Lenore had done of a person using her fusing technique.  The most difficult part was finding the perfect flesh tone fabrics which in the shadows and water were very purple.  Lenore ended up using her fabric paints and painting the colors and values of fabrics that she needed for them.

When Lenore found out she had won, she thought that it was “very exciting to win a prize like this!  I like to have my art quilts in large shows so others can see what can be done with fabric.  If I win a prize that is the icing on the cake!” She is planning to use her prize money toward the purchase of a new car where she can “enjoy it every day!”

What does the future hold for Lenore? She has already finished a large piece this past winter that she plans to enter either in 2018 or 2019 at Road to California.  She loves to have a large piece in the works.  For Lenore, the larger the piece the more detail she can add to it which “makes it all the more fun!”

We can’t wait to see what Lenore has created next!!

To learn more about Lenore, please visit her website.

 

Road 2017 Faculty: Meet Linda Matteotti

Linda Matteotti will be  teaching two stand up, longarm classes :

Monday: 1015C  Begin with a Stencil 

Tuesday: 2016C  Simple but Amazing Projects on a Long Arm 

Four hands on, computer design classes:

Wednesday: 3007C  Mastering Electric Quilt Level 1  

Thursday: 4007C Mastering Electric Quilt Level 2

Friday: 5007C Electric Quilt – Foundation and Appliqué Patterns

Saturday: 6006C Art & Stitch for Longarm Digitizing  

And a half-morning drawing class:

Sunday: 7006C  Zentangle Drawing  

A  resident of Tempe, Arizona, Linda Matteotti is a versatile and qualified teacher. She is  a Handi Quilter Longarm Educator, an Art Stitch Certified Teacher, an Electric Quilt and EQStitch Instructor, and a Certified Zentangle Teacher (CZT). Besides Road to California, Linda has also taught as far away as Australia and South Africa.  When she’s not quilting, Linda does Zentangle drawing and book folding. 

How did Linda get started in longarm quilting? “I was not having much success with machine quilting on my domestic machine, so I decided to try free motion on a longarm. After achieving success on that, I am now able to quilt on a domestic machine or sit-down longarm with great results. After purchasing my Handi Quilter longarm in 2008, I became an Educator for them and have enjoyed teaching all over the world.”

Inspiration for Linda’s designs comes from “absolutely everywhere.” She thinks Pinterest is a “most amazing resource.” Some of her work has been quilting her mother’s beautiful embroidery creations.

What is the one quilting tool that Linda cannot live without?  “Electric Quilt (EQ7). I never make a quilt without it. Regardless of whether I’m piecing by machine or hand, applique or whole cloth. Every quilt I make begins it’s life as a layout in Electric Quilt.”

Linda’s favorite aspect of teaching is “watching the “lights go on” with her students, Her favorite moment is when she hears “that was worth the price of admission,” at the end of a class. Linda also hopes her students gain the ability to be independent with their quilting and designing. 

What is Linda’s best quilting tip?  “There are no “always” or “nevers” in your quilting journey. Explore different techniques and adopt the ones that work for you.”

You can learn more about Linda on her website.

 

Road 2015 Faculty Spotlight: Meet Heidi Stagno

Heidi is teaching two day classes: 1008R Grid It and Stitch It on Monday; and  2011R Texturize on Tuesday. She will also be teaching three evening classes: 4075R Super Size Your Sashing on Thursday, 5078R Super Simple Stipple on Friday and  6077C Make It and Take It on Saturday.Heidi Stagno headshot

Heidi Stagno learned to love and appreciate quilting from her Grandma Leota while growing up in Pocatello, Idaho. Remembers Heidi, “Grandma Leota came from a humble household.  She put grandpa through medical school and he later became the Chief of Staff of the Idaho State Mental Hospital.  So needless to say grandma was no longer poor.  My sister and I did not learn to piece quilts because that was for ‘poor people.’  Grandma Leota would purchase yardage and match the print and sew-up two widths of fabric for the top and it was nothing but flannel for the back.  We stretched the fabric and attached it to the frame and hand tied each quilt.  Grandma Leota found many other ways to keep my sister and I busy on those cold, long Idaho nights.  That’s how my quilting journey began.”

Today, Heidi lives with her husband John and twin, 6 year old daughters. Her mother Judy is also an accomplished quilter.Heidi Stagno work3

Heidi loves to quilt on her Longarm machine. “I bought my first longarm machine 14 years ago.  For the first year my machine and I just dated and we got to know each other.  The second year we got engaged and I really started bringing in the customers.  I was booked with more quilts than I could keep up with.  So sometime between year three and four we got married and I quit my full time career job.  At that time, I also let go of a husband. He just didn’t get the quilting thing, so out he went.  I spent two years single, supporting myself completely on my longarm quilting.  Then I found a new husband.  The quilting machine gave her stitch of approval and we got married, to Mr. Right this time.  In the span of one year I got married, bought a house, bought a quilt shop and I was pregnant with twins by the end of the first year.” Heidi recently sold the quilt shop and is back to quilting full time.  In addition to her machine, she also has two machines that she rents out and she teaches longarm quilting on. And, she is a Handi-Quilter Dealer. Heidi Stagno work

What is Heidi’s method for longarm quilting?  “I love developing the depth, dimension, and texture on quilt tops.  My students ask me, ‘How do you know what to quilt on so many different quilts?’ My answer is: look into the quilt and it will tell you.  While I have not experienced a quilt that will actually talk to me, I do investigate the piecing, the fabric, and the scale of design, the style or theme.  The answer is very simple “opposites attract.” If the quilt has busy fabric or lots of piecing, I go simple.  If the quilt is plain and simple I dress it up with fancy stuff.  Then I go to work auditioning designs with preview film.

During her two years of supporting herself with her quilting, Heidi says she learned a thing or two that can help other longarm quilters:

#1 If your machine is broke you will be too.  So keep it clean!!  Keep it happy!!  Keep quilting!!

#2 Learn how to fix your machine so you don’t have to live with-out it while it’s at the dealer.  No machine=no quilting=no money=homeless. ( lol)

#3 Some quilters say “get known for one style” No way. I love all types and style and techniques. Learn them all.Heidi Stagno work2

Heidi hopes the students in her classes first learn to relax a bit.  She says that her quilting went to the next level when she finally said to myself, “Well… either they will bring me their quilt or they won’t. Get over it.  Let go of the unrealistic self-inflicted pressures.  Just enjoy and have fun and it will come.” She also tells her students that they will not leave the class being proficient at that particular technique.  What she teaches is HOW to practice the technique. She also likes to share her “pea brain analogies.” Heidi has a specific thought process while quilting each and every design.  She likes to teach her students the theory behind free-motion quilting not just tricks.  For Heidi, it’s all about the ELEMENT, REPEAT, ROTATE and TRAVEL!!!

You can learn more about Heidi on her blog: http://quiltingwithheidi.blogspot.com/

So You Want To Make A Winning Quilt: 2014 Outstanding Innovative Quilt

You may have missed our deadline this year to enter your promising award winning quilt for Road to California 2015 – 20th Anniversary Show competition, but there is always next year!!

Gail Stepanek began her journey of making an award winning quilt by taking a quilt class at a local church in the early 80’s. It was a quilt trimmed in lace.  Four quilts later, she learned that there was supposed to be binding on a quilt.  On the fifth quilt she made, she learned that she was supposed to make her own matching binding…not buy packages of blanket binding. “Talk about being a slow learner!” recalls Gail.   

How did Stars to Mars come about? Gail likes to paper piece and she decided to try her hand at designing several stars.  She didn’t feel that she was proficient enough to draft the quilt in EQ7, so she asked Barb Vlack to help her and Barb was kind enough to draft it for her. Gail learned that all she needed was one star pattern.  By changing fabrics and sewing lines, she could create different looking stars.  Stars to Mars

It took over a year and a half to make the top and her collaborative partner, Jan Hutchison  spent three months quilting it.  Road to California 2014 was the first show that Stars On Mars was entered in and we were overjoyed at winning such a great award.  Jan and Gail shared the award money– $3,000 given by Handi Quilter.  Gail has used her winnings to attend several quilts shows throughout the year.  In fact, she just booked her flight to Ontario, California for the 2015 Road to California show!!

What does the future hold for this award winning quilt maker? Gail and Jan hope to continue their collaboration for years to come.  She just received another quilt that Jan had recently finished quilting. Gail was burning the midnight oil to make the deadline for Road 2015 so watch for it in next year’s competition.

 

Mastering The Art of Long Arm Quilting

Last year when reading student’s class evaluations, many asked for more time on the long arm quilting machines without sharing the machine with other students.  To answer these requests, Road 2014 has scheduled long arm classes that are four hours in length with one student per machine head. These classes will have only 10 students in the class giving everyone more time for individualized training and practice. It’s almost like a private lesson!!  Handi Quilter  is  providing their Sweet 16  machine. Handi Quilter Sweet 16

                                  

 

Gammill

 

                                                                                        For the first time at a quilt show, Gammill is providing their Charm model for students to use. This “sit down” machine uses techniques that can be applicable to domestic machines as well.

 

 

 

During Road 2013, acclaimed modern quilter Angela Walters, shared her tips on how to enhance your long arm quilting:

Angela Walter stitching

  1. Use thread that blends with the background. Look at the quilt first and then choose what thread to use. The thread color should lie over the entire top. One of the biggest errors is to use light thread on a dark fabric.
  2. All over quilting adds interest to a quilt. Stitch the biggest components first, and then go to the smaller areas. Highlight what you notice the most. 
  3. Contrast comes in the quilting, not the thread colors. Use quilting to echo the lines. Use favorite designs in the borders.
  4. Stitch from top to bottom on the quilt. Float the quilt top and pull in to the middle.
  5. Keep the bobbin loose and don’t use the stitch regulator.
  6. Remember: quilting is a skill and a skill can be learned. Don’t over think your quilting!

The four hour, long arm quilting classes are being offered throughout Road to California 2014.  There are six sessions scheduled on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, January 20-22; three in the morning and three in the afternoon all days.  Two sessions each will be held on Thursday and Friday nights. There is one evening session on Saturday night and finally, two morning classes on Sunday, January 26th.  The Road to California web site has all the information for exact times, teachers, projects, and machines that will be featured: www.roadtocalifornia.com  Sign up now to take one of these classes that features skilled instructors, quality machines, individualized training and lots of practice to learn or improve your long arm quilting skills.10861

2013 Winner-Excellence in Long Arm Quilting Sponsored by Handi Quilter

Claudia Pfeil