Tag Archives: Domestic Machine Quilting

Meet Road 2018 Teacher Cindy Seitz-Krug

Cindy Seitz-Krug will be teaching 4013C  Gorgeous Gridded Quilting Level 1 on Thursday

and 5601C  Fabulous Trapunto Wallhanging on Friday and Saturday

Cindy Seitz-Krug specializes in using a home sewing machine for her heirloom quilting. She owes her love of quilting to her mother. When she was 28 years old, Cindy and her mom took a beginning quilting class, taught by Jenny Carr-Kinney, at the community college in Ventura, California. After that class, Cindy says, “I was completely hooked on quilting.” Unfortunately, today, Cindy’s mom suffers from Alzheimer’s and doesn’t remember that she “used to be quite the quilter.” Luckily for Cindy, both of her half-brothers’ wives quilt, so she is still able to quilt with some family.

An author and award-winning quilter, Cindy won $1,500.00 for Excellence In Machine Quilting at Road 2017 for her quilt, Blush. A wholecloth quilt, Cindy said that her biggest challenge was finding “just the right balance of larger motifs that will dazzle, and subtle but beautiful backgrounds to make the main motifs pop, and also make the viewer delight in the detail.”

Cindy says she gets inspiration for her quilts from quilt shows.  “Seeing all those amazing quilts gets my wheels churning and gets me excited to create something beautiful of my own,” shared Cindy. She has also taken quilt classes from three different instructors that have had an impact on her quilting technique: Diane Gaudynski for Machine Quilting; Sally Collins for Piecing; and Elly Sienkiewicz for Applique.

What is the one quilting tool that Cindy can’t live without? “Well, I’d have to say a small, sharp pair of scissors, and a thimble (two tools).  And of course, my BERNINA.”

Cindy’s best quilting tip is to persevere if you really want to be able to do something.  “When people tell me, ‘I could never quilt like that!’, I say, ‘Yes you can; it just depends on how badly you want to do it.  If you want it badly enough, you can!’

What does Cindy like best about teaching? “I love when my students tell me that my classes are the best they’ve ever taken!  And amazingly, I hear that a lot.  It makes me puff up with pride!”

Cindy hopes that after her students leave her classes that “they will feel empowered and confident in their ability to quilt their own quilts beautifully.”

In addition to her quilting, Cindy enjoys hunting and fishing in the Rocky Mountains. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, in Environmental and Systematic Biology, with a concentration in Fisheries Biology. For more than 20 years, Cindy and her husband owned their own aquaculture facility in Bakersfield, CA, raising catfish for sale to grocers and restaurants. They recently sold their fish farms and relocated to the White Mountains of Arizona.

To learn more about Cindy, please visit her website, Quintessential Quilting.

Experience Both Domestic And Long Arm Quilting In These 2017 Classes

For the first time, Road to California is offering an industry room where students will be able to experience firsthand, quilting on both domestic and long arm machines. Mel’s Sewing and Fabric Center and BERNINA have teamed up to provide both types of sewing machines for classes taught by Mandy Leins, Paula Reid, and Jenny Bowker.berninamtclogo-600

How did this concept idea get started?  Matt Reese, Road’s Show Director, approached Mel’s Sewing and Fabric Center with the idea and they loved it!! Mel’s has been a BERNINA dealer since 1960 and has been supporting Road to California for many years. BERNINA machines have been requested repeatedly for classroom opportunities because they are easy to use with a proven success record for all levels of sewing interest. Mel’s is providing 10 standard domestic BERNINA machines and 10 BERNINA long arm machines for use in the industry room classroom.bernina-longarm-q20-500x500

The long arm machine being featured is a BERNINA Q 20 – a sit-down long arm machine. This model accommodates the best of both worlds: it can be placed on a frame or set in a cabinet. Using a frame allows the quilter to move the machine while the fabric is stationary. With the cabinet, the fabric can be moved under the stationary machine.

Each instructor assigned to teach in the industry classroom —Mandy Leins, Paula Reid, and Jenny Bowker — will share specific techniques on both machines.

Fluff & Stuff will be taught on Wednesday and Thursday by Paula Reid, Class 3401C

Fluff & Stuff will be taught on Wednesday and Thursday by Paula Reid, Class 3401C

On the domestic machine, features that will be highlighted include the walking foot, darning foot, basting stitch, BERNINA Stitch Regulator, pedal control, the Freehand System, and user interface to achieve amazing results.

The sit-down long arm will emphasize hands-on work with acrylic templates, the #96 foot, BERNINA Stitch Regulator, user interface, and pedal control

Quilting with a Starter will be taught by Jenny Bowker on Saturday, Class  6001C

Quilting with a Starter will be taught by Jenny Bowker on Saturday, Class 6001C

Students will be encouraged to spend time on both machines. With the experience on a domestic machine, anyone should be able to apply the skills at home to come up with creative and beautiful designs on their personal machines. And after experiencing the Q 20, students can use their hands-on experience to see what amazing things can be done with templates on a sit-down longarm.

Road to California is thrilled to be the first show in 2017 to experience the BERNINA Q 20 in a classroom setting.

 

So You Want To Make A Winning Quilt- Road 2016 Outstanding Art Quilt

Beach Sculptures was made and quilted by Judy Leslie. She won $5,000 from sponsor Handi Quilter, Inc. for winning Outstanding  Art Quilt at Road to California 2016.

Photo credit: Judy Leslie

Photo credit: Judy Leslie

Judy Leslie is from Coquitlam, BC Canada. Her original design took about a year to complete. She uses a domestic machine for her quilting!!Judy Leslie

How did you get started in quilting?  I have always loved designing with fibre (this is the Canadian spelling of fibre!).  My interest began as a pre-teen by dreaming up and sewing ‘exotic’ doll clothes for my younger sister.  I then moved on to constructing a vast array of garments over the years.   About twenty years ago I discovered the wonderful tactile nature of cloth in ‘quilt’ form. I began by making a few traditional style quilts, but soon developed an interest in creating art quilts.  Once I retired from a teaching career, I was able to devote more time to experimenting with techniques and designs.  I am forever inspired by the lushness of our local landscape as well as recent journeys to other vistas.

What inspired your winning design?  My husband and I have spent many winter vacations leisurely exploring Kauai’s beaches.  The slowly eroding shoreline produces exquisite ‘beach sculptures’. The remains of trees, with their intertwined roots, are stripped of their bark and gradually reveal incredible tints of creams, pinks and grays.

How long did it take to make your winning quilt? What did you learn along the way?  I usually focus on making at least two pieces at a time as I ponder and plan future projects.  The complexity of each artwork’s construction means that a single piece may take many weeks or even months to complete.  Sometimes family responsibilities or travel takes me away for periods of time, yet often this time allows me to contemplate ways and means of enhancing the projects that I’m in the process of completing.

Photo Credit: Judy Lesllie

Photo Credit: Judy Lesllie

What was your reaction when you found out you won Outstanding Art Quilt?  I was ecstatic!  I was awarded Best Painted Surface at the Road to California in 2013 and I thought that nothing could surpass that thrill.  When I received the news I was with my husband and friends on the Big Island of Hawaii wishing I could be at the show in California.

Did you do anything special with your prize money? Other than purchasing a huge selection of threads that I have coveted for at least ten years, my prize money is in my Savings account!  My ‘workhorse’ domestic machine has never let me down for eight years;  I now have a contingency fund should my machine decide to be uncooperative in the future.

Where do you go from here with your quilting? At the moment I am creating two major pieces.  Although I am using different materials and techniques, both pieces have an animal theme.   Making art quilts is an important part of my life and I receive immense pleasure from working in this medium of artistic expression.

Since 2007, I have exhibited quilts in a number of major quilt shows and galleries in both Canada and the USA.    Many award winning pieces can be viewed on the Fibre Art Network website. 

I have taught a variety of classes in the past.  Physical limitations now prevent me from this pleasure so I am contemplating self publishing a book on some of my favorite techniques.

Editor’s note: You can read a more detailed account of Judy’s work on Beach Sculptures in the Autumn 2015 edition of  The Canadian Quilter magazine CQA/ACC.