Category Archives: Faculty

Patriotism Runs Deep With This Road 2018 Teacher and Vendor

Deb Granger is all about patriotism and giving back.

She and her husband, Duane, own Freedom Star United, a quilt supply company featuring military and patriotic quilt fabric, kits, and patterns. They started their company in 2008 after she had lost her job. She knew she wanted her next venture to be something that “would make a difference.”

Why a military and patriotic theme? Because two of the Granger’s sons and one daughter-in-law have served in the Marines. In fact, Deb made her first quilt for one of her sons during his first deployment. Says Deb, “Our hearts are with the military.”

Michigan residents for the past 25 years, the Grangers are on the road most of the time, attending 30-35 quilt shows a year. “Road to California is our favorite,” said Deb. “The people are great.” Wherever they go, Deb and Duane are on the lookout for a veteran to give a patriotic quilt to. When they attended Road to California 2016, they resented a quilt to then 88-year-old Morrie Hegg from Apple Valley, California. The Grangers learned that Mr. Hegg was a World War II veteran, having served in the 11th Air Force Army Air Corp in Alaska. He came to Road 2016 with his wife and daughter who are both quilters.

Besides having a vendor booth, Deb will also be teaching a class on Monday:

1006C   Sewing Tool Caddy

One of Road 2018’s “non-quilting” classes.

Sewing machines for the class will be provided by Bernina.

Deb says she enjoys teaching and the “one on one time I spend with each of my students.” She believes her students will gain “confidence” if “they are willing to try.” Her word of sewing advice to her students? “Take your time.”

When Deb isn’t teaching or working in her vendor booth, she likes to spend time with her grandkids, bake, and run in half marathons. We hope our guests will run right over to Freedom Star United’s booth for an added boost of patriotism during Road 2018.

To learn more about Deb and Freedom Star United, please visit their website.

 

 

 

Artwork Classes That Enhance Your Quilting Skills

No sewing machines are required for these intermediate to advanced level artwork classes that will be taught by Esterita Austin at Road to California 2018:

Wednesday: 3001C  Luminous Painted Irises

Thursday (2 day class): 4501C Luminous Painted Illusions

Saturday (2 day class):  6701C  Animal Portraits

A resident of Port Jefferson New York, Esterita Austin has lived there for 40 years. Esterita has many master sewers in her family. Her grandfather was a master pattern maker in the garment industry of New York where today he would have been considered a designer. Esterita’s grandmother was a master seamstress and her aunt made all of her clothes and her family’s clothes and is the one who taught Esterita how to sew.

In 1980, Esterita began quilting by doing traditional bed quilts for her children. She discovered art quilting in the 1990’s and as she says, “it took over like a fever.” Lately, Esterita has been painting on parchment paper and transferring the image onto organza and then painting—the same technique she will be sharing in her classes.

When Esterita isn’t quilting, she is traveling. It is with her travels that she finds inspiration for her quilts, taking photographs of what interests her. Currently, she has a thing for old, rusted out cars. The furthest Esterita has traveled that is quilt related is Australia and New Zealand.

One of the things Esterita likes best about teaching is meeting other teachers on the road and sharing experiences. When she is in the classroom, Esterita loves seeing the lightbulb go off above her students’ heads. She has found that “people who say they can’t paint always seem delighted when they learn that they can.” One of the most satisfying things for Esterita to teach is value and value is used in all of her classes. She hopes her students learn how to use value successfully and that they gain confidence in their abilities.

Artwork by student, Sue Bianchi

What is Esterita’s her best quilting tip? “Take a dry, Mr. Clean sponge, apply Dritz iron-off to it and then rub on a hot iron to clean the soleplate. Always use in a well-ventilated area as this procedure will cause some smoke.”

To learn more about Esterita, please visit her website.

 

Meet Road 2018 Teacher/Vendor and Hurricane Harvey Survivor: Cynthia England

Cynthia England is an international fiber artist, pattern designer and author who is known for many things in the quilting industry:

She has won Best of Show at the International Quilt Festival in Houston 3 times. Her latest award-winning quilt was this past Spring for her work, Reflections of Cape Town

Her quilt, Piece and Quiet was distinguished as one of “The Twentieth Century’s Best Quilts.”

She owns England Design Studios, where she promotes a technique she has developed called Picture Piecing

And as of August 25, 2017, Cynthia England is survivor of Hurricane Harvey, the catastrophic storm that sent record breaking rainfall to southeastern Texas.

Cynthia has lived in Houston, Texas her whole life. She currently lives in Dickinson, Texas; halfway between Galveston and Houston. When Hurricane Harvey hit, Cynthia and her family were at home. She remembers, “We have a two-story house. My studio and our garages are on the lower floor and all of our living space is up above. We had 7 neighbors who had one story houses come and stay with us. We watched the storm from our deck up above; very scary. I live on a creek, but our house is built up high. We still got a foot of water in the downstairs area. At one point, there were minnows in my laundry room; very freaky.”

There was lots of discussion with Cynthia and her family whether or not to leave when the mandatory evacuation was called. In the end, they felt safe because they were up high. Her neighbor had a canoe tied to their post so they could get out if they had to. Two of the neighbors staying with them were elderly; one in her eighties; one ninety. They also had an engineer and a nurse with them. So, they felt that it would be best to ride it out. They never lost power and their water was fine.

Because she is “always a quilter,” (Cynthia has been quilting since she was 13), as she and her neighbors were waiting out the storm, Cynthia taught two of the ladies that were stuck at her house how to piece a lap quilt!! Cynthia related, “They are making a Texas charm quilt and were excited about it. It took their mind off of things. We all got to know each other better and I feel like I have made some fast friends. Nobody ever bitched, moaned or cried. They took the canoe to their houses and brought back food. We even had turtle cheesecake one night. They were awesome!”

How did Hurricane Harvey affect her quilts and her business? “All of my Horn sewing furniture is toast; sewing tables, cutting tables. I had 13 book cases that were ruined; file cabinets, computer desks. A lot of my booth supplies for quilt shows are ruined. I had time to move my fabric up, so I didn’t loose any bolts. Two were damp and I have washed them. About 20 yards of my personal stash got wet, but my friend helped me wash it and I am good there. I did have business files fall into water. All my sewing machines were taken upstairs and all my quilts are fine.”

Of her Hurricane Harvey experience, Cynthia says, “All in all, we feel extremely fortunate. Because we didn’t leave we were able to start cleaning up immediately. The water went down overnight. This has been an amazing experience. Not one I want to repeat, but this too shall pass.”

England Design Studios will have a booth at Road 2018 and Cynthia will also be teaching 2003C Sandy Shore on Tuesday at Road 2018.

Cynthia hopes her students realize “how much easier her technique, Picture Piecing, is than paper piecing. There is no paper to pick out.  You work on the right side of the fabric. If you don’t sew perfect, you remove the freezer paper and re-iron. Lots of cheating!”

We wish Cindy well as she continues her Hurricane Harvey recovery and look forward to seeing her at Road to California next January.

 

 

 

Meet Road 2018 Teacher Kristin Vierra

Kristin Vierra will be teaching two classes utilizing Gammill stand-up longarm machines on a stationary frame. These classes are on Monday 1014R   Fun Feathers that Fit Anywhere

and Tuesday: 2014R  Easy Background Fillers for Longarm Quilters

Kristin will also be teaching a class on Wednesday where Brother machines will be provided for each student’s use: 3016C  Easy English Paper Piecing by Machine 

Then, on Wednesday evening, Kristin will be teaching a design class (no machine necessary) 3068C  So I got it pieced, now what? 

A Lincoln, Nebraska native and former University of New Mexico nursing teacher, Kristin Vierra has also lived in California, Arizona, Florida, Colorado, Iowa, D.C., Tennessee, and Louisiana before returning back to her roots in Lincoln about 10 years ago.

Kristin’s great-grandma taught her mom how to quilt and in turn, Kristin’s mom taught Kristin how to sew. As Kristin says, she has always sewn in one form or another, and even made an occasional baby blanket.  Kristin tried hand quilting but thought hers “never looked right; instead of nice even stitching, I had Morse code. You know, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash.”  She also felt that she never seemed “coordinated enough to quilt on a domestic.”  Plus, it always made her shoulders ache on big projects. When Kristin moved back to Lincoln, she “was lucky enough to find a used Gammill Longarm. That was when I really actually started quilting. My longarm and I just clicked and the rest as they say is history.”

Kristin finds inspiration for her quilting literally “everywhere.”   It drives her husband and kids nuts because she has been known to come out of a bathroom and ask for the camera because there was a particularly cool tile that she wanted to use as inspiration for a quilt.  Architecture, carpets, nature, designs on people’s clothes— all are fair game to Kristin when it comes to quilting. 

While she uses many quilting tools, Kristin’s favorite is her design board.  She had it custom made out of clear plexiglass with registration marks to help her divide up blocks.  Kristin places it on top of a quilt and draws on it with dry erase markers.  It makes it really easy to audition designs, without having to mark the quilt or even worse rip out stitches. She’ll be demonstrating this tool in her “So I got it pieced, now what?” class.

Her best quilting tip is “don’t be afraid to try.”  Kristin admits that “some of my coolest creations have come from my biggest mistakes.”

Kristin’s favorite aspect of teaching is “that moment when you can see the ‘light bulb’ go on in someone’s head.” All of a sudden, “some concept or technique they have been struggling with becomes clear and they get so excited.” For Kristin, that’s the absolute best feeling to be a part of.

What does Kristin hope her student get out of her classes? “I want them to go away inspired and excited about whatever project they are going to work on next.  It doesn’t matter if you are making cuddle quilts or the next BOS winner.  All that matters is that you are enjoying yourself and having fun.”

To learn more about Kristin, please visit her website.

Road 2017 Faculty: Meet Linda Matteotti

Linda Matteotti will be  teaching two stand up, longarm classes :

Monday: 1015C  Begin with a Stencil 

Tuesday: 2016C  Simple but Amazing Projects on a Long Arm 

Four hands on, computer design classes:

Wednesday: 3007C  Mastering Electric Quilt Level 1  

Thursday: 4007C Mastering Electric Quilt Level 2

Friday: 5007C Electric Quilt – Foundation and Appliqué Patterns

Saturday: 6006C Art & Stitch for Longarm Digitizing  

And a half-morning drawing class:

Sunday: 7006C  Zentangle Drawing  

A  resident of Tempe, Arizona, Linda Matteotti is a versatile and qualified teacher. She is  a Handi Quilter Longarm Educator, an Art Stitch Certified Teacher, an Electric Quilt and EQStitch Instructor, and a Certified Zentangle Teacher (CZT). Besides Road to California, Linda has also taught as far away as Australia and South Africa.  When she’s not quilting, Linda does Zentangle drawing and book folding. 

How did Linda get started in longarm quilting? “I was not having much success with machine quilting on my domestic machine, so I decided to try free motion on a longarm. After achieving success on that, I am now able to quilt on a domestic machine or sit-down longarm with great results. After purchasing my Handi Quilter longarm in 2008, I became an Educator for them and have enjoyed teaching all over the world.”

Inspiration for Linda’s designs comes from “absolutely everywhere.” She thinks Pinterest is a “most amazing resource.” Some of her work has been quilting her mother’s beautiful embroidery creations.

What is the one quilting tool that Linda cannot live without?  “Electric Quilt (EQ7). I never make a quilt without it. Regardless of whether I’m piecing by machine or hand, applique or whole cloth. Every quilt I make begins it’s life as a layout in Electric Quilt.”

Linda’s favorite aspect of teaching is “watching the “lights go on” with her students, Her favorite moment is when she hears “that was worth the price of admission,” at the end of a class. Linda also hopes her students gain the ability to be independent with their quilting and designing. 

What is Linda’s best quilting tip?  “There are no “always” or “nevers” in your quilting journey. Explore different techniques and adopt the ones that work for you.”

You can learn more about Linda on her website.

 

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Jacqueline Kunkel

Jacqueline Kunkel will be teaching on Wednesday, 3006C Proud Mary

Thursday, 4006C Seeing Spots

Friday, 5006C Island Breeze

and on Saturday, 6703C Vintage Compass

Jacqueline Kunkel, her husband, and her two “wonderful Quilt Inspector Kitties,” recently completed a cross country move from Connecticut to Mesa, Arizona. Why the move? Jacqueline had been coming to the valley since her grandparents moved there in 1970.  Jacqueline and her husband had been going to Arizona for about 30 years.  She has lots of family there (Mom and Dad, Cousins, Aunt and Uncle), so  they have developed a love for the desert and Arizona.

Jacqueline blames her husband for her start in quilting. When she was pregnant with their first child, he suggested that Jacqueline get a hobby.  At the time, she was a garment sewer and heavy into making baby clothes for their newborn.  She took a formal quilting class, at her husband’s urging, and hated it.  She says it was probably because of the format in which it was taught: cutting cardboard templates with scissors.  No rotary cutters, mats and rulers.  Eventually, Jacqueline took another class that had all those things and she” was hooked!!!”  That was in 1993 and it has been her hobby turned business ever since then.

When Jacqueline is not quilting, she and her husband “LOVE” to hike, walk, explore, and fly (Jacqueline’s husband has his own little plane).  They fly almost every day as the Arizona weather “is just sunny and gorgeous.”

What is the one quilting tool that Jacqueline can’t live without? Her glue pen.  Jacqueline says, “I use it essentially in place of pins.  It allows my fabric to lay flat and I can handle it with ease.  From paper piecing to appliqué, to binding, there really isn’t anything you can’t use it on.”

When it comes to teaching, Jacqueline absolutely adores “seeing my students creating and then seeing the finished projects.  I also love helping them through the process.  It is very rewarding.” She hopes that her students walk away with more than one new tip or technique” that they can apply to their quilting in general. 

Jacqueline’s best quilting tip is that she does not use steam in her iron. She always uses a dry iron as she has found over the years that steam will stretch the fabric which results in a block not fitting properly or not being square.

In September, 2015, Jacqueline published a new book, Splash of Color:  A Rainbow of Brilliant Black and White Quilts.

Jacqueline says that “It was born out of a desire to write about something that I love… black, white, and bright fabrics. These are fabrics that my stash is not lacking in any way shape or form.  I loved designing the quilts in this book, and better yet, thoroughly enjoy teaching them too.  I love the photos that my students and other quilters send me of their completed projects.  It is very satisfying and fulfilling… (The book) is fun, the designs are versatile, and black, white, and bright fabrics are timeless!!”

To learn more about Jacqueline Kunkel, please visit her website.

Meet Road 2017 Faculty Jennifer Rapacki

Jennifer Rapacki will be teaching on Thursday, 4017R  Charm Pack Table Runnerjr-charm-pack-table-runner

On Friday 5018R and Sunday 7011R,  Weave that Quilt Backgroundjr-5018r-weave-that-quilt-background

And two half day classes utilizing technology:

Saturday Morning, 6017R  Fractal That! Quilt Design on an iPad jr-6017r-fractal-that-quilt-design-on-an-ipad

Saturday Afternoon, 6018R  Print That!  With Photoshop Elements6018r

Jennifer Rapacki learned to sew as a young girl, starting out sewing clothing. Eventually she got into couture techniques for the clothes she made for work as well as tailoring jackets for her husband.  As the workplace became more casual, Jennifer turned to quilting as a way to continue working with fabric.   Her first quilt was actually made in 1983 from a log cabin pattern kit of calico prints.   She didn’t know to do the binding and no fabric was provided for it in the kit, so she turned the backing to the front (“we didn’t have YouTube back then”). Of course, today, Jennifer knows many ways to bind a quilt!!jennifer_rapacki

Jennifer does most of her work in a quilt studio space she owns in Ventura, California because she and her husband live on a sail boat in Channel Island Harbor. She finds inspiration for her quilting “just about everywhere.”  On a recent trip to Spain and Portugal, she was continually seeing “quilt designs” on the buildings and sidewalks.  In Lisbon, she knew she was probably the only tourist continually stopping to take photos of the cobblestone sidewalks. One design is posted on her Instagram that she thought would make a great border.

A brass Stiletto is Jennifer’s favorite quilting tool. She says it’s her “3rd finger.” How did Jennifer start incorporating technology in to her quilt designs and techniques? It began in 2008 when she started playing with inkjet printing on fabric on her home printer and developed a Photoshop Elements class that she taught at the local quilt shop.  It was after her quilt guild in Santa Maria asked her to speak about what she was doing with inkjet printing on fabric and Electric Quilt in 2010, that she started offering her lecture about Modern Technology for Quilters to other quilt guilds and teaching workshops.malibuonfire

She began using an iPad for classes she was teaching at quilt shows because she wanted to reach a broader quilting audience who didn’t necessarily want to lug around a laptop to a show.  Plus, according to Jennifer, “the maturity of the iPad has brought more capability to the apps available.  I am continually looking at what apps are available to see if they can be applied to quilting design.”

One of Jennifer’s best quilting tips is how she makes stitched mitered corner binding (joining binding in the corners).  Originally used for her custom inkjet printed binding, it also allows for changing colors in the corners along with being great to use on small quilts where it would be difficult to join binding in the middle of a side.  Quilting Arts Magazine plans to publish Jennifer’s article about this technique in the Feb/Mar 2017 issue.stars_that_i_see-lg-2

What does Jennifer like most about teaching? “Learning from my students.  I think I learn as much from them as they do from me.  I especially like when they take the technique I’m teaching and go in a direction I hadn’t thought of.”

To learn more about Jennifer, please visit her Facebook Page.

 

 

Tuffets: All The Rage Is Coming To Road 2017

Pagen Lewis will be teaching 1201R  Square Tuffet  on Monday and Tuesdaytuffet

Experiencing trying times in life sometimes end up being a great motivator in trying new things.

That’s exactly what happened with Pagen Lewis. Pagen’s mom and sister had always sewed, but according to Pagen, she “just didn’t get it.” About 17 years ago, when Pagen found herself going through a rough patch and had some extra time on her hands, her sister suggested that Pagen should take a quilting class. At first, Pagen “laughed” at the idea. After a lot of her sister’s pushing, Pagen finally agreed to take that class and fell, “hook, line, (and) sunk.”  About six months after that, Pagen purchased her first long arm and started quilting for charity and customers.

When Pagen learned that her job that she had for 18 years in the computer industry was being moved overseas, she had six months to figure out what she was going to do next for work. As a single mother with 3 young children, she began researching how to start a business and what quilt shops were in her area. Guess what? There weren’t any!!  Within that six months, Pagen opened Quilter’s Cocoon in Riverside, California and started running her own business. That was 15 years ago and Quilter’s Cocoon is still going strong.  448x337_img_1527jpg

How did Pagen get involved in making tuffets? She saw a round tuffet on-line made with Kaffe Fassett prints. She searched everywhere to purchase one. She didn’t end up finding one but she did find a place to take a class that also offered certification to teach.  That was in July, 2015. Pagen actually made two tuffets before she even went to the class for training.

Pagen has taught hundreds of students how to make both round and square tuffets. She started teaching  her round tuffet classes in August, 2015. She wrote the pattern and had the fusible interfacing printed for the square tuffet and began teaching that class in June, 2016.

What can you do with a tuffet? Pagen says they are perfect for “special gifts.”  She says that many tuffets have been taken over by students’ family pets and that grandchildren like using them to play favorite board games.images

Pagen’s favorite tuffet was one she made out of red Kaffe Fassett Colletive fabrics. Once, she made a patriotic one for her father and on the bottom, put photos of him from the Korean War and his and her mother’s wedding photo.

While there is some sewing machine work involved, Pagen’s tuffet class is part of Road 2017’s non-quilting classes that include several beadwork classes.

Pagen and Quilter’s Cocoon will also have a vendor booth at Road 2017.

 

 

Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Amanda Leins

Amanda Leins is one of the teachers in Road 2017’s new industry room classes where students will be able to experience firsthand, quilting on both domestic and long arm machines. Amanda’s classes include:

Monday 1007C  Refined Rulers: Using Templates With Domestic & Sit Down Machinesa-leins-rulers

Tuesday 2010C  Blended Quilting: Combining Ruler-work With Free Motion Quilting On A Domestic Machinea-leins-blended-quilting

Wednesday 3012C  Fundamentals of Free Motion Quiltinga-leins-fundamentals

Thursday 4012C  Improv Quilting: Creating Curves Using Straight Linesa-leins-improv-quilting

Friday  5012C Aqueducts: Piecing Curvesa-leins-aqueducts

How did a trained classical archaeologist like Amanda Leins become a well-known quilter? a-leins4It all began with the men in Amanda’s family. Her maternal grandfather remembered carding the batting as a 6 year old boy during the Depression, listening to the ladies gossip as he sat underneath the quilting frame. Amanda got started in quilting on a visit to her grandparents about 14 years ago. Her “fella” (now Amanda’s husband) had to work while they were visiting so she had days to sit with her grandparents and listen to her Grampa Johnny share his love for quilts and how much he admired the ones left to their family, many of which Amanda had never seen before that trip. Her Gramma Nita had an in-cabinet Singer that many family members (mom, dad, aunts and uncles) had sewn on and Amanda wanted to be part of that tradition. Amanda made her first quilt on Gramma’s Singer, cutting things out on a coffee table, and never looked back.

Amanda’s background in classical archaeology comes through with her quilting. Much of what she designs and makes is based upon the art and architecture of the ancient world. Her book shows how to take those ancient things that are timeless and still make fresh and modern designs. Amanda also appreciates how classical design principles are based upon observations of the natural world. She is thrilled to know that she is carrying on a grand tradition of working with her hands to make beautiful and functional things. She believes that “this creative act is something that is an integral part of what it is to be human.”a-leins2

Amanda has traveled all over the United States to take and teach quilting classes. Her two favorite classes that she has taken have been a practical class taught by Kimmy Brunner on trapunto and a class taught by Karen McTavish. While Amanda has yet to make a trapunto quilt, what she learned has helped with some tricky quilts that Amanda says “were less than perfect and had some extra fabric in some places and not in others.” Regarding her class with Karen McTavish, Amanda says she likes how Karen “approaches quilting design and finds her artistic process so very interesting.”

What is Amanda’s favorite quilting tools?   For piecing, she cannot “live without” her glue basting and starch. For quilting, she adores working with rulers and templates, and is “wildly in love” with her BERNINA Q24 longarm which she says is “so fun to use.”

Amanda’s best quilting tip is to relax and smile. She shares, “If your shoulders are down and you’re actually smiling a real (smile) and not gritting your teeth, you get less stress headaches and your quilting designs will be more fluid. If you find yourself tensing up, get up, walk around, shake out your muscles, and smile! Your body and your quilting will be grateful!

Quilt designed by Janet McWorkman and quilted by Amanda Leins for Janet's book,  "The ABCs of Quilting "(C&T)

Quilt designed by Janet McWorkman and quilted by Amanda Leins for Janet’s book, “The ABCs of Quilting “(C&T)

Amanda got into quilting because “it brings me delight and being able to share that is, well, delightful!  Whether that’s providing a solid knowledge base, my tips and tricks, or sharing my love of the whole process, I want each student to come out of that class thinking ‘that was worth it. I can do this!’” You can expect Amanda to try and give as much information and time to practice in class as she can so that each student has what he or she needs to be successful and delighted in their work when they get home, not just those first few days, but as they continue to grow in their quilting abilities.

To learn more about Amanda, please visit her website.

Meet Road 2017 Faculty’s Three Sisters

When you sign up for these classes, you get to enjoy the expertise of the three sisters behind Sew Kind of Wonderful and their Quick Curve RulerHelen Robinson, Jenny Pedigo and Sherilyn Mortensen.

Wednesday Evening: 3064C  Mini Kitesmini-kites

Friday Evening:  5070C Mod Pineapplesmod-pineapples

Helen Robinson, Jenny Pedigo, and Sherilyn Mortensen are three of four sisters that share their love of quilting through their business, Sew Kind of Wonderful. Currently, they live in three different states:  Sherilyn in Cedaredge, Colorado; Jenny in Everett, Washington; and Helen in Mesa, Arizona. Between them they have 14 children, 3 grandchildren, and 2 dogs.

(l-r) Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn

(l-r) Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn

How did these three sisters get started in quilting? About 20 years ago, Helen taught herself to quilt from a Fons and Porter book when she had to teach an after school sewing/quilting class to junior high students. She taught Jenny how to quilt soon after that.  At about the same time, Sherilyn was teaching herself because she wanted a big quilt for her bed.

Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn’s quilts mostly have a modern feel. They find inspiration for their designs in everyday objects: patterns in floor tiles, weaving, nature, and also through a desire to challenge themselves to go to a different place than the usual.helen-robinson

Their business, Sew Kind of Wonderful, began with Jenny’s brain child, the Quick Curve Ruler. She wanted it to be a family affair that would give the three of them a chance to see each other more often as none of them (and their other three siblings) live close to each other.quick-curve-ruler

All three sisters are equally involved in the design, piecing, and quilting process.  They have a constant group text running and lots of FaceTime.  Jenny manages the distributor orders.  Helen does the online store and wholesale orders, and Sherilyn does the blogging and trunk shows.

Of course, the Quick Curve Ruler and the QCR Mini Ruler are their favorite quilting tools.  They haven’t sewn a quilt without a curve in five years because their Quick Curve Ruler made quilting fun again!  Each sister also has a longarm — a Gammil Classic – that they love.  It allows them to do the whole creative quilt process from design, fabric selection, piecing and finishing it off with the quilting.

Teaching classes together says Helen “is the cherry on top” because they get to see quilters when they have their ‘lightbulb’ moment; when the methods and processes they use click and their students fall in love with sewing curves. Helen adds that the sisters ‘have a great time being together!  It is the best part of our business.   If you spend any amount of time with us there is way too much conversation about ‘gluten free’ and ‘bathroom issues’….LOL”

What can their students expect to get out of their classes? “Lots of energy, conversation, hands-on help, and uniquely different snacks,” reports Helen. “We want students to enjoy a no stress approach to quilting and piecing curves.  There are not any quilt police that will knock on your door at 11 pm and tell you you did it wrong.  Enjoy the quilting process.”

Besides teaching their classes, you will also find Helen, Jenny, and Sherilyn during the show in their vendor booth for Sew Kind Of Wonderful.  helen-robinson2

To learn more about Sew Kind of Wonderful and the Quick Curve Ruler, visit their website.