Meet Road 2017 Teacher David Taylor

David Taylor will be teaching 2 classes that are a Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen sit down longarm class. These classes use the same skills as a regular sewing machine.

1004C   The HQ Sweet 16 Overture on Mondaytaylor-hq-sweet-16-overture

2007C  Rhythm and Hues on Tuesdaytaylor-rythym-and-hues

David will also be teaching two applique classes:

3009R  Simple Floral Appliqué on Wednesdaytaylor-simple-floral-applique

4601R  Animal Artistry through Appliqué a 3-day course, Thursday-Saturdaytaylor-animal-artistry

Award winning quilter, David Taylor, knows about adversity.  Last February, a gas explosion and subsequent fire destroyed his home in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Since the fire gutted the living room and the sewing loft, David has been without his tools and supplies for the past nine months. Both of his Berninas were melted; his serger was gone; rulers were twisted and turned and his Handi Quilter Sweet Sixteen was a major loss. Needless to say, it was a very devastating experience.  David says, “Every day since the fire, life gets a little easier and a little harder at the same time. I’ve been taking long walks, reading and doing jigsaw puzzles to occupy my thoughts” until he can start to rebuild his studio.davidmtaylor2015

Born in 1963, David was raised in Peterborough, New Hampshire, one of six children: three boys and three girls just “like the Brady Bunch.” His mother “tied” quilts while David was growing up but as a single mom with six kids, she didn’t have much free time to devote to quilting.

David first focused on apparel construction. In 1998, a longtime friend who knew of David’s life-long love of fabric, suggested he try quilting. He was reluctant at first as he didn’t want to cut up his “precious fabric collection.” Since then, he has never looked back.

Because he has never taken a quilting class, David believes that the best way to learn is to practice, practice, practice, practice, practice, practice and makes a lot of mistakes. In addition, he believes that quilting “should be a team sport,” He recommends joining a guild or a group and getting together with like-minded “fabric fondlers.” And if there isn’t a group where you live, David says, “Start one.”taylor_beneathbywing

For David, there is no greater satisfaction than “seeing a student’s face light up when they realize they CAN do this!”  He hopes his students will learn that if they create from their heart, the rest will follow.taylor_didyouwashyourbeak

Before he comes to Road, David will be looking forward to purchasing a home in Henniker, New Hampshire. The house was originally built in 1825, and was renovated at the turn of this century to include a two-car garage with studio and office space above. David says it is “Perfect!”

To learn more about David Taylor, please visit his website.

Meet Road 2017 Teacher Claudia Pfeil

Claudia Pfeil will be teaching six, hands on, stand up  longarm classes that allow for two students per machine head:

Pimp My Quilt! on Monday 1012N and Saturday 6015Npimp-my-quiltPaisley Parade on Tuesday 2017Npaisley-parade

Bubbles, Curves & Straight Lines – A Way to Modern Quilting on Wednesday 3016N  bubbles-curves-and-straight-lines

Claudia’s (P)fantastic (P)freemotion Borders on Thursday 4015Npfantastic-pfreemotion-borders

And on Friday 5016N Modern (P)freemotion Wholeclothp-freemotion-whole-cloth

At Road to California 2017, several of the class instructors are coming from outside the United States and Claudia Pfeil is one of those teachers. Claudia is from Germany. She grew up in Hemer and has lived in Krefeld since 1985. A town with a population of 240,000 in the mid-west part of Germany, close to the border of Belgium and Netherlands, Krefeld is known as the “Town of Velvet and Silk” because of its history of silk weaving.

Growing up in a family of bankers, Claudia was the one who loved to draw and paint. She tried everything from pottery, silk painting, water color painting, and even making carpets out of knots.  When she graduated from school, she moved to Dortmund and started an apprenticeship as a display designer in a warehouse. It was through that job that in 1985 she was first exposed to quilting by attending Creativa –Europe’s leading exhibition for creative design.claudia-vor-quilt

The biggest sewing project Claudia has ever done was the first quilt she ever made. It was made without using any rotary cutters or rulers and the basic sewing machine she used could only secure the layers for hand quilting. She taught herself the tricks of making templates and seams. According to Claudia, “there was much ‘trial and error’.”

After the birth of her first son, Julian, in 1992, Claudia delved in to quilting. She found some fabric pieces she had stored away; 12 inch squares she had woven on a 16 shaft loom while attending  university. She just knew they belonged in a quilt. Needing thread to put the quilt together, Claudia went to a local sewing shop and they introduced her to her first rotary cutter, mat and quilting ruler. With perseverance, Claudia set out to “learn by doing.” She recalls that those “experimental times gave her the courage to improvise. I was soooo happy and I got hooked.” Looking back, Claudia says, “I have to smile about my self-confidence without having any clue.”

Claudia has been a student of textile design, an independent textile designer, a patchwork quilting teacher, and a quilt shop owner. But she says her world changed completely in the spring of 2005 when she bought an APQS Longarm.

Having taught throughout the United States, Australia, and Europe, Road 2017 will be Claudia’s first time at the show. She says, “I am really happy and proud to be invited.” All of her classes are hands on, longarm quilting classes. Her goal is to set her students free to think out of the box. She hopes they will leave the classroom with a big smile on their face, happy and proud of themselves, and remember her tips when they go home to work on their projects.

To see more of Claudia’s work, please visit her Facebook Page.



Meet Road 2017 Faculty Anita Grossman Solomon

Anita Grossman Solomon will be teaching six classes, Wednesday through Sunday, at Road to California 2017:

Wednesday 3005C and Sunday 7004C:  Self-Mitered Log CabinSelf-Mitered Log Cabin Top (detail) Straight Furrows

Thursday: 4004C  Two-Color Pineapple solomon-two-color-pineapple

Friday: 5004C Big Bang Starsags-big-bang-stars

Saturday (Half-day Morning Class):  6004C  BeJeweled solomon-anita-grossman-jewel-quilt-top

Saturday (Half-day Afternoon Class): 6012C Double Wrench

Double Wrench Quilt

Double Wrench Quilt

New York native, Anita Grossman Solomon, grew up in Niagara Falls, New York.  She learned to sew garments at the Singer Sewing Center on Falls Street where she “aced” her first dart on a treadle sewing machine!! After graduating from college as an art major, Anita immediately moved to Manhattan where she lives today. Her office and sewing room/studio are both within her apartment. Anita says when she needs to venture outside, she turns “on the Today show to see what the bystanders are wearing” to know how to dress for the day,anita-grossman-solomon-bio-photo-courtesy-craftsy

The idea to start her company, Make It Simpler, began in the summer of 2001. Anita was attending a C&T Publishing retreat in northern California and showed their acquisitions editor Polaroid pictures of her work.  The editor took notice of Anita’s workaround methods and said, “I know what you do, you make it simpler.” A week later, Anita registered the domain name for Make It Simpler.

Quilt blocks are what inspire Anita and define her work. “Just place one in front of my eyes and I’m fascinated.” Her first  block design for Make It Simpler was a paper piecing pattern for an unusual quilt block based on a block found on the cover of a book by Terri Zegart. “The block engaged and soothed me when I needed a distraction from the real world, ” recalled Anita. “As I closed my eyes to sleep, a radical new way to paper piece came to mind.” That began Anita’s relationship with C&T Publishing and her innovative paper piecing books.

What is Anita’s favorite sewing tip?  “To thine own self be true. Make what you like and enjoy. Do what comes naturally. Trust your color and design instincts.”

In her Road classes, Anita hopes her students “get satisfaction from my techniques and leave with inspired additions to their quilt-making repertoire. A lucky someone in each of my classes will win a fat quarter bundle of Make It Simpler KONA cottons courtesy of Robert Kaufman Fabrics. As for me, I always win when someone tells me ‘That tip was  worth the price of admission’.”

Road to California appreciates Anita’s contribution to their charity quilt event at Road 2017 on Saturday evening, Roadies Give Back Anita specially designed the block that is being used for the quilts, deconstructing and making simpler her favorite block, Jacob’s Ladder. Of the event benefiting the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center, Anita says. “I’m finding comfort while sewing my blocks for Road. I hope you’ll follow (Road’s) footsteps and assemble a block. You can’t fathom what’s missing from the process until you try it for yourself.”

Anita is really looking forward to being at Road 2017.  She hopes to “run into quilters I’ve previously met, see what they’ve been up to, and look at every quilt in the Show.” She bets that while she is in sunny California, when she turns on the Today show, she’ll see everyone in New York walking around in the snow!!

You can learn more about Anita at her website and on Craftsy.


An Afternoon of Celebration


For the past four years, Road to California has been supporting the Robert and Beverly Lewis Family Cancer Care Center located at Pomona Valley Hospital by purchasing a table for their annual fund raising fashion show and luncheon at the Sheraton Fairplex.img_0001

Because cancer has struck the Reese family in the past, both Matt and Carolyn Reese feel that it is an important cause to support. In addition, Matt’s mom and Carolyn’s daughter-in-law, Shellee Reese, has worked as the Administrative Director for the cancer center for the past 15 years.

Carolyn’s guests included members of her extended family

Back row (l-r) Jen Reese, Matt Reese, Shellee Reese. Front row (l-r) Lee Ann Akers, Debby Bennett

Back row (l-r) Jen Reese, Matt Reese, Shellee Reese. Front row (l-r) Lee Ann Akers, Debby Bennett

As well as two friends who are both cancer survivors. Elainne Edwards is a 15 year thyroid cancer survivor who enjoys  making charity quilts. Lavella Fitzgerald, also a quilter, is a 15 year breast cancer survivor.

Elainne, LaVella, and Carolyn

Elainne, LaVella, and Carolyn

Being at the luncheon brought back emotions for Lavella. ” It is wonderful to be with so many survivors today and to know that everyone is working for a cure.”

The day included a delicious Asian theme luncheon followed by a fashion show where the models were each cancer survivors in their own right. Men and women modeled three outfits: casual, business, and formal. They were joined on the runway during the business section with the health professionals who they credited with helping them overcome their cancer. Then, for the last segment, each model chose a family member who was especially supportive during their cancer journey to walk with them down the runway. Each model’s story of courage in their trials was very inspiring for all in attendance.

At the end of the event, Elainne remarked, “It encourages me to see the support of this community and know that you are not alone.”

Road’s support for this important community center will continue at Road to California 2017 when they will hold their first Roadies Give Back evening of service on Saturday, January 21st beginning at 7:00 p.m. roadies-give-back2

The goal for the evening is to make and quilt as many charity quilts as possible to donate to the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Center. Sewing machines will be set up in several rooms and guests can choose to participate by helping to put together quilt tops, quilting the quilts, or finishing the quilts.saturday-january-21-7-00-pm

The Roadies Give Back quilt block design was specially created by Road 2017 faculty member, Anita Grossman Solomon.  In order to speed things along that evening, Road is asking for the quilt blocks to be made ahead of the show and delivered to their office starting December 5th. Whether or not you plan on attending Road 17, anyone can participate by making as many quilt blocks as they would like, following the approved design.

Road to California is honored to give back to the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center, where there is found “A passion for healing. A love of giving.”

For more information regarding Roadies Give Back, please visit our website.





Giving Back At Road 2017

“The life of a man consists not in seeing visions and in dreaming dreams, but in active charity and in willing service.     Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Road to California has teamed up with the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center in Pomona, California and Anita Grossman Solomon, one of our Road 2017 Faculty, to make as many quilts as possible on the Saturday night of Road 2017. All quilts produced that night will be given to cancer patients at the center on behalf of everyone participating with this wonderful cause.roadies-give-back2

The Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center was chosen as the recipient of Road’s night of service because Show Director Matt Reese’s mom, Shellee Reese, has been a long time employee at the center. Roadies have supported the center in the past, casting votes for the award winning video that won valuable donation dollars to the center in 2014.

Linda Rasmussen is overseeing the project and the Sew-A-Thon that will take place Saturday, January 21st beginning at 7:00 PM. Linda has been a volunteer at Road in the judging room for 17 years.  She joined Road to California’s staff last year, first as Ribbon Clerk in the judging room and now the Coordinator for Roadies Give Back.

Linda says the goal for Roadies Give Back is to supply lap size quilts to the patients of the Robert and Beverly Lewis Cancer Care Center.  The quilts will be made from a block designed by Anita Grossman Solomon especially for Road to California.  Road to California fans and attendees throughout the United States and overseas are invited to make the blocks prior to the show.  Then, on January 21st, all of the blocks received will be assembled into quilt tops, quilted and prepared for donation to the Cancer Care Center. During the evening there will be door prizes and raffle prizes along with yummy treats.

How can you be a part of this worthwhile event?saturday-january-21-7-00-pm

  • Tell a friend.

Share this blog post in an email, with your social media or with your guild. Linda has already started to visit guilds in the area. She says the response “has been enthusiastic.”

  • Make a square (or two or more!!)

There is no limit to the amount of blocks you can contribute. A raffle ticket will be given for each square donated. We will start accepting squares at Road’s office beginning December 5, 2016. Mail them in, roper them off, or bring them to the show.

  • Register for the event.

Go to our website and sign up to assist with either piecing (class 9600C), domestic quilting (class 9601C), longarm quilting (class 9602C) or finishing (class 9603C).

A nominal $10 fee will be collected at the time of registration. Half the fee will go to directly to the Cancer Center and the other half will be applied to deferring costs for supplies for the evening.

  • Join in the fun.

Stay at the show after the classes have finished and the vendors have closed. Machines will be provided for the night. Guests are encouraged to bring thread, snips, pins and any other items that makes sewing more productive for them.teachers_classrooms__i4c5741

We hope you will want to be a part of this very special event. As Linda says, “It is a great opportunity to show support to people who need to know that we are all working toward making their challenge of facing cancer just a bit less intimidating.  Something to keep you warm, made with love, showing support, is a visible way to make a difference in someone’s day.”

To learn more about Roadies Give Back including getting the pattern for the squares and where to send them when you are done, please visit our website.



Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Rose Mary Jameson

Rose Mary Jameson will be teaching 4018R Laguna Crochet Necklace on Thursdaylaguna-crochet-necklace

5019R   Bead Embroidered Needle Case on Fridaybead-embroidered-needle-case

 6019R   Beaded Felted Cuff on Saturday beaded-felted-cuff

And 7012R   Infinity Button Bracelet on Sundayinfinity-button-bracelet

Rose Mary Jameson is all about reinvention. A graduate of Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM), she began a custom design business, working in Ultrasuede for professional women and then later, designing bridal gowns.rose-mary

When a local ice skating rink opened, she connected with the first coaches and showed them a few costume design ideas. For more than seventeen years, she designed costumes covered with Swarovski crystals and sequins for competitive skaters and a few pros who traveled the world. When the rink closed and the skaters moved away, Rose Mary replaced the ice with the dance floor and began to have the same relationship with dancers.

Costume for Cirque 1

Costume for Cirque 1

Following the opening of a large quilt and bead store, Monica’s Quilt and Bead Creations in Palm Desert, California, Rose Mary approached the owner, armed with her designs and an idea. As a result, Rose Mary has been a teacher, pattern designer and consultant for the store for over 10 years. Her adventures have included best-selling patterns, such as the Twirly Batik Skirt she developed in 2009.14b6ed_bc066a1e06a8517d7a58e1d23477cb05

Inspiration for Rose Mary’s bead designs come from “everywhere:” birds and flowers, architecture, the beach, and current fashion trends. She writes her ideas down in a journal, along with a quick sketch, notes on color combinations, or ways to wear a piece.

Rose Mary made this necklace for her daughter's wedding.

Rose Mary made this necklace for her daughter’s wedding.

Rose Mary is not a new face to Road to California. She has taught several Roundabout events in the past, meeting lots of fun and creative people. “I always love being in a good space where there is creative energy and Road is certainly one of those places.”

Although most guests come to Road for the quilting, Rose Mary feels that “having a little diversion could prove to be great inspiration.” She hopes that by the guests getting their hands into something a little bit unusual, perhaps their brains will start to think in different ways, leading to more excitement with their first love, quilting. Rose Mary knows many quilters who love to bead, paint and write and thinks it is “healthy to know and practice our art with diverse group of skills.”

Who should attend one of Rose Mary’s classes at Road 2017?  “Anyone who might like to learn more about the art of bead-weaving or adding a little bit of bling to their lives or to their quilts. And who doesn’t like a little bit of sparkle now and again?” Rose Mary says that quilting skills translate easily into this medium and that she is looking forward to sharing with her students the “many ideas that are swirling around in my head.” She enjoys watching her students play with her ideas. “Helping others realize they might already have the skills needed to create something from a little stash of beads is always heartwarming.”

You can learn more about Rose Mary Jameson on her website, Sewfast Design, or on her blog, Sewfast Beader.



So You Want To Make A Winning Quilt: 1st Place Innovative, Wall, Pieced Road 2016

Beth Markel won 1st Place: Innovative, Wall, Pieced for Spring Storm at Road 2016. She received $1,000 from sponsor, Artistic Creative Products.1st-place-innovative-wall-pieced

Beth Markel’s interest in quilting began when as a little girl, threading needles for her Grandmother Broyles, who lived with her family.  Grandma Broyles was always cutting a quilt, sewing a quilt, and quilting a quilt – 3 quilts in 3 different stages.  Heaven for young Beth was sitting under the quilt frame her father built for her grandmother, practicing her spelling words.

While Beth is a 5th generation quilter, for a while it didn’t look like she would be a part of her family’s tradition.  She got discouraged with sewing when her 7th-grade Home Economics teacher commented to Beth, “Stick to cooking, because you can’t sew worth a darn.”  It wasn’t until Beth was 36 years old that she decided to attempt quilting and made her first 9-patch. She has been hooked ever since.

Beth and Sophie

Beth and Sophie

The inspiration for Beth’s winning design came from an experience she had after graduating from college and starting her first job in Boston. She had to travel often to New York City and one sunny morning when she was at a farmer’s flower market, a spring storm roared through.  Beth recalls, “Literally, one minute there were purple iris and golden daffodils and crocus, and the next there were purple and yellow petals spinning and whirling through the air.” That impression has stayed with her to this day.

Spring Storm is the first in a series of four seasonal quilts Beth is designing. Beth believes “there are seasons in our lives.  Spring happens when we’re young, a little wild, tempestuous, naïve, and turbulent…the beginning of growth.  Evolution.  Storms.  Setbacks.  More growth.  Beauty.  So stand back.  No, literally, stand back!  The only way to see the twister is to stand back a way, then be slowly drawn into the joy that is every single decision, every single choice, and every single piece that together, tell a story.”

It took Beth almost 14 months to make and quilt Spring Storm partly because  the piecing got so tiny (less than ¼” x ¼”) and all the seams were ¼.”  The quilt has a lot of “stitch in the ditch” as well as quilting in individual squares.  All of the threads were tied-off and hidden because she used her regular sewing machine, a Bernina 300, to do the quilting.  Because of the basis of the piece, Beth wanted to give voice to each individual piece of the pattern.  And while her choice was “tedious and wildly time-consuming,” Beth says it was “worth the effort in the end.”

Persistence is what Beth says she learned the most from Spring Storm.  When she decided to start the 4-Seasons series based on her life, she knew she had something specific to say.  Her youth was fairly wild, and she was constantly straining against where others wanted to pigeon-hole her.  Beth has realized that growth begins “when we’re honest with ourselves, regardless of what anybody else thinks about us.”  Spring Storm actually began as a 9-patch and then a 16-patch, hearkening back to her first quilt – with determination to say something new.

When Beth heard she had won first place, she was “speechless surprised.” She used some of her prize money to enroll in a writing class to help her with her blog. The rest of her winnings was spent on more fabric.

Where does Beth go from here? She is currently working on her second piece of her series, a summer themed design, which is up to 5,000 small pieces at this point. She has a “fun & interesting” trunk show which she presents to quilt guilds, as well as teaches 1, 3 and 5-day workshops. Two of her quilts are currently hanging in the National Quilt Museum as part of the book, “Art Quilts of the Midwest” by Linzee McCray.

Thumbs InVinoVeritas by Beth Markel

Thumbs InVinoVeritas by Beth Markel

Another two of her quilts are part of the exhibit, “Circular Abstractions:  Bull’s Eye Quilts” curated by Nancy Crow, which opened in August, 2016  at the Muskegon Museum of Art.  She continues to write on her blog, discussing everything from long-arm quilting to what happens when a quilter passes away with unfinished projects.

Beth’s quilting interests are many, varying from applique, fabric painting, indigo, and fabric dying to thread painting and using Shiva sticks. Whatever she is working on, Beth remains steady with her “persistence in fine-tuning her voice, breaking down walls between groups of artists, and making textiles relevant to people who only see “quilts” as worn-out bedspreads their grandmothers made…grateful & joyfully!”

To learn more about Beth Markel and her work, please visit her website.


How to Enter Your Quilt Online

Is your quilt ready to submit for the Road to California 2017  Quilt Contest?

By now, you have read and become familiar with the complete Road to California 2017 Quilt Contest information including rules, quilt categories and definitions at our website. You’ve spent hours and hours working on your quilt design and then having it quilted. You are finally ready to submit it to our office and we are ready and waiting to receive your entry. We want to make sure you are confident on how to complete that last step: submitting your quilt entry.  

The deadline to enter your quilt(s) for Road to California 2017 is Monday, October 3, 2016.

Entries can be mailed in to Road’s office or submitted online. By entering online, you save both time and money. Online entries save $10.00 on their submission.

Award Winning Quilt Best of Show Road 2016

Best of Show Road 2016 – Silk Road Sampler by Melissa Sobotka

Matt Reese, Road’s Show Director, has provided these easy step-by-step instructions to help you enter your quilt online:

In order to process an online entry, you need to have an online account and be logged in. If you have any questions about the log-in process, please check out this previous blog post that explains how to log-in. Although the article focuses on how to register for classes, the process to log onto our online system is the same).

Once you are logged on, move your mouse over to ROAD2017 and click Contest Entry.  (Don’t worry about the dates in our examples below. The procedure is still the same).

First, on the upper left hand corner, you need to select Quilt under division. Second, you need to choose a Style which will be either Art, Innovative, Miniature, Modern or Traditional.

Photo 1

I selected Art. Next, you need to select a Theme. Since my entry is a quilted photograph of Pug, Max.  I’ll select Art Critter. (For information on themes, check out the information on the rules. If you have any questions about what theme your quilt belongs in your can either email us at  or make your best guess and if the jury/judges determine it belongs elsewhere, they will move it).

Next you need to put in the Dimensions of your entry. My quilt is 60 x 60. If your quilt meets the size requirements for the category you choose, a green message saying “Road to California entry category: xxxx” and a green Submit button will appear.

Photo 3

Enter the Title, Maker’s Name and Quilters Name. Please Note: we have had complaints in the past about failing to list the quilters name. We print what you submit, and have no way of knowing if you have not changed the Quilters Name. It is the entrant’s responsibility to ensure the entry form is accurate.

The Design Basis is a required field. This is where you should list what your design basis for your entry is (Pattern, Book, Photograph and so on.)

Photo 4

I started my quilt in 2010 and completed it in 2013. I am a first time entrant. I quilted my quilt with a computer assisted longarm machine.

Lastly, I completed my Artist Statement. Once finished click Submit.

When you click submit, you should be taken back to your account home page which shows a purple box with Contest Entry information.


Photo 5Next, I need to submit my Photos. Click upload under front to upload a front picture of your quilt. Helpful Hint: make sure your photos are at least 2,000 pixels on the smallest side prior to uploading. Any smaller than 2,000 pixels will be rejected.

Photo 6

Once you have uploaded your photos, pay the entry fee by clicking pay bill. Enter your credit card information and you’re all set!

Photo 7

If you have any questions about our online entry process, please let us know by email:

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Meet Road 2017 Faculty: Sharon Miller

Sharon Miller will be teaching on Friday, 5067C  Espadrilles  and on Saturday,  6063C     Espadrilles  sharon-miller-one-shoe

Road to California 2017 will be featuring several handwork classes, including these beginner to intermediate level classes on how to make espadrilles shoes by Sharon  Miller. sharon-miller

Espadrilles are casual, flat, shoes that originated in the Pyrenees. They usually have a canvas or cotton fabric upper and a flexible sole.sharon-miller-brocade

Sharon has a Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics, clothing and textiles. She began sewing, crocheting, and tatting when she was 10 years old and has created everything from clothing and costumes to home décor, bridal gowns, crafts and quilts.sharon-miller-dress

How did Sharon get started in making espadrilles? “I love new things and when I saw the espadrilles I could hardly wait to start making them.  I envisioned them with kids clothes, casual wear, in leather, and a fun bridal party activity.”sharon-miller-childs

There was a bit of a learning curve in learning how to make the shoes. Sharon tried all kinds of fabrics and had to figure out how to adjust the fit for unique feet.  Luckily for Sharon’s students, she has developed many quick tips to make the process easier that she will be sharing in her classes.

Does Sharon have a favorite espadrilles style? She likes — and has a pair — of both flats and wedges. In her Road 2017 classes, students will be making the flat version.

At Road 2016, Sharon demonstrated her espadrilles shoes in the EE Schenck Company booth in the Marketplace. It was such a popular demonstration that the Reese family asked her to offer a class at Road 2017. Previously, she has taught her espadrille class for shop owners in Portland, Oregon in 2015.

Sharon is excited to share something she loves to make that has become natural to her. Students can expect to finish at least one pair of shoes and hopefully start the second pair before the end of class. Sharon describes her classes as both “fun and educational.” She adds, “We have a good time.”




So You Want To Make A Winning Quilt- 1st Place Modern Piecing

Rebecca L. Smith of Rapid City, South Dakota won $1,000 from sponsor Clover USA for winning 1st Place for Road 2016 Modern Piecing.

Modern Medallion

Modern Medallion

Rebecca L. Smith says she was “very fortunate” to have had a grandmother that quilted who patiently taught her to hand piece and quilt many years ago. Rebecca added, “I miss her every day.”null

Modern Medallion was started in 2014 and finished in 2015, taking 60-70 hours to quilt. The quilt was inspired by Rebecca’s rather large collection of beautiful gradated fabrics and from the interesting curved patterns from Sew Kind of Wonderful. She said she learned a lot about curved piecing on this project.  The quilting on Modern Medallion is mostly free hand.

What did Rebecca think about winning 1st place for Modern Piecing? She was ‘so excited” when she found out and was pretty sure she spent her prize money on buying more fabric.

Rebecca is hoping that her future quilting endeavors will challenge her to design an original pattern for her next quilt .